First-rate Men’s Shed open

There are dozens of men lining up to join the Sanctuary Point Men’s Shed, now the group’s equipped to cater for an influx of members.

They will join 47 men who have been benefiting from the camaraderie of the community group for many years.

On Tuesday morning, the Men’s Shed hosted the official opening of their new site, one of the most grand sheds in the region, fitted out with woodwork and metalwork tools.

In what was a mammoth community effort, the group helped to build the shed, along with local tradesmen such as electricians, plumbers and concreters who assisted with discounts on their services.

President Ray Marcusson said they can soon get stuck into major projects, donate arts and crafts, participate in more community events and actively promote men’s health and well-being to more people.

“Just the other day we built a ramp for an old guy that couldn’t come out of hospital until the ramp was built,” Mr Marcusson said.

“Those things we can do for free.”

The shed is 40x15m.

“It’s a big enough shed,” Mr Marcusson said.

“We’re very lucky to have it.”

A Men’s Shed member offered his farm up to the group for a period of six years until they were able to fund and build the new facility.

“He allowed us on his property for six years,

“We said one year and stayed for six.”

At the start of the project they had $45,000 and they raised a further $100,000.

“IGA was very good to us, let us run BBQs out the front, and donated all the sausages,” Mr Marcusson said.

“People in the community were generous, donated a lot of money.”

With the help of South Coast MP Shelley Hancock, the group secured a $85,000 NSW Government Community Building Partnership grant, that made construction of the shed a possibility. 

Mrs Hancock said men’s sheds are vital community investments that foster community spirit, social connectedness, inclusion and promote good mental health.

“25 per cent of the guys are returned veterans, they’re looking for companionship, the rest of them are looking for the same thing,” Mr Marcusson said.

“It’s a place for them to have a meet and talk.

“When the wife says, ‘get out’, this is where they come.”