Letters to the editor

PIC OF THE WEEK: Matt Jeffrey snapped this shot near Broughton Creek. Submit entries via Facebook, Instagram or email.

PIC OF THE WEEK: Matt Jeffrey snapped this shot near Broughton Creek. Submit entries via Facebook, Instagram or email.

Farewell and thank you

I am writing to the community to say a genuine personal thank you for the support and good will you have extended to me as your Ward 3 councillor over the past four years. The challenging role has been a full time one needing a commitment to help and make change where needed.

I have learnt much about running a city the size of Shoalhaven with its 100,000 population, its 3.1 million tourists, its 2700km of roads and many different needs and hopes of our community.

The role has been demanding indeed calling on every once of passion to work with and assist thousands of people with their individual or village projects while also working with council and our dedicated Mayor to plan and action the big picture city vision issues.

The opportunity to meet with so many of you has been wonderful and has opened my eyes  to the huge efforts of our local Lions and Rotary clubs, the tennis, netball, basketball and other sports clubs, the community associations (CCBs), the Ulladulla Forum, the Historical Society, the RSL and legacy branches, the Surf Lifesaving Club, the men’s sheds, the hospital auxiliary, the Milton Library team, the business chambers and the many recreational groups such as the Entertainers and the Milton Follies and all the organisers of the Blessing of the Fleet and Arts Escape,  the Park and Bushcare groups, Landcare. Thousands of volunteers doing selfless and  great things for us all.

Nothing can be achieved alone and I congratulate and thank sincerely our outgoing mayor Joanna Gash and her leadership, each and every member of council executive and staff, my hardworking colleague Cr Patricia White and Ward 3 councillors Mark Kitchener and Amanda Findley for their generous contribution to building our region.

I am very proud to have been part of this chapter of Shoalhaven City, and as I am standing down from office, I take this opportunity to thank you all for your good will and confidence and wish you all a continued cohesive and positive future.

A. Baptist, Bawley Point

Every minute counts

On behalf of the Stroke Foundation I would like to thank the thousands of Australians who helped us educate the community about the importance of knowing the signs of stroke this National Stroke Week.

National Stroke Week is our annual campaign to shine the spotlight on stroke, raising awareness of the devastating impact of this insidious disease.

Stroke Week is an opportunity for all Australians to learn about stroke and how they can reduce their own risk. I am confident there are thousands of people in the community who now know about the FAST message thanks to the more than 2,500 activities that were held across the country.

With Stroke Week now wrapped up for 2016, it is vital we remember strokes don’t just happen one week of the year. Every 10 minutes an Australian has a stroke. Every 10 minutes someone’s life changes forever.

Stroke is shockingly common in Australia. Yet despite the devastation it causes, this disease is largely unrecognised by the broader community – until it happens to a loved one, a friend or a colleague. Stroke is largely preventable, but we know that almost 50,000 new and recurring strokes will happen this year. Stroke is treatable but again we know that many stroke patients will miss out on lifesaving treatment because they don’t get to hospital on time.

Stroke strikes suddenly and often without any warning. When it does happens, every minute counts. Time is brain. For every minute that parts of the brain are left without oxygen, brain cells are dying. A speedy reaction to stroke can mean the difference between life and death or permanent disability. Stroke doesn’t have to be a death sentence, it is treatable but people need to know the signs of stroke and get to hospital fast. Every stroke is a medical emergency.

S. McGowan, Stroke Foundation

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