There's more to David Berry Hospital

Meroo Meadow man Mick Claydon and his wife Trish can’t speak highly enough of the treatment he received in the rehabilitation unit at David Berry Hospital.

Meroo Meadow man Mick Claydon and his wife Trish can’t speak highly enough of the treatment he received in the rehabilitation unit at David Berry Hospital.

A LOT of people believe David Berry Hospital is just a place where terminally ill patients go to die.

But Meroo Meadow man Mick Claydon said there was much more to the hospital.

Mr Claydon recently spent eight days in the hospital undergoing rehabilitation after major back surgery.

“I cannot talk highly enough of the staff at Berry, they were absolutely fantastic,” he said.

“There is so much more to the hospital than palliative care. A lot of people probably don’t realise there is a rehabilitation section of the hospital as well.

“The nurses, the physios they were all fantastic.”

Mr Claydon underwent an 11-hour emergency back operation in Wollongong Hospital to repair damage to his L4-L5 vertebra, having a metal plate and six screws put in place to keep his back, worn out from years of playing sport and physical work, together after “it finally gave up the ghost”.

“I spent a week in Wollongong, with time in intensive care and high dependency and then had to continue my rehabilitation and I chose to go to Berry and it was a great choice,” he said.

At 67, he was one of the younger patients at the 19-bed rehabilitation unit, but said he was treated superbly by the staff and had a great time talking to some of the older patients.

The David Berry Hospital has a history dating back to 1889, when local agriculturist and land owner David Berry directed trustees to set aside 100,000 pounds for the purpose of building a hospital in the area.

The hospital was planned for the inhabitants of Berry and Broughton Creek areas and the Shoalhaven District.

It was officially opened as a state health institution in 1909.

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