Reconciliation dance lifts spirits at Stockland Nowra

Aboriginal leader Gerry Moore with Doonooch Dancers Andrew McLeod, Owen Ward and Luke McLeod-Ebsworth and Nowra East Public School students Nali Timbery McLeod, Wezley Wellington, Jarrah McLeod, Raymond Towney, Brayden Omoeboh, Larry Timbery McLeod, Zack Kelly, Emily Timbery McLeod, Matthew Stewart, Ebony Gay, Raquel Rebolledo Sutton, Hayley Stewart and Shenikqua Nicholls after their shopper-stopping performance at Stockland Nowra on Thursday.

Aboriginal leader Gerry Moore with Doonooch Dancers Andrew McLeod, Owen Ward and Luke McLeod-Ebsworth and Nowra East Public School students Nali Timbery McLeod, Wezley Wellington, Jarrah McLeod, Raymond Towney, Brayden Omoeboh, Larry Timbery McLeod, Zack Kelly, Emily Timbery McLeod, Matthew Stewart, Ebony Gay, Raquel Rebolledo Sutton, Hayley Stewart and Shenikqua Nicholls after their shopper-stopping performance at Stockland Nowra on Thursday.

A Reconciliation Day event at Stockland Nowra captivated shoppers as 16 Aboriginal dancers sang and danced their way through the mall on Thursday.

It was like a conga-line with children from Nowra East Public School in traditional Aboriginal dress supported by members of the Doonooch Dancers complete with didgeridoo and clapping-sticks.

Their music echoed throughout the building, stopping shoppers who then clapped along, took photos and filmed the dancers on phones and tablets.

Aboriginal leader Gerry Moore congratulated Stockland Nowra staff members Julie Modena, Kristy Miglionico and Coralie Bell for their role in organising the performance and the day’s events.

“Stockland approached us as a way of strengthening the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people,” Mr Moore said.

“When we try to drive things like this it doesn’t have the same impact as when someone else does it.”

Representatives from Habitat Personnel and Nowra Youth Services were on hand to speak with people about what they could offer in the community.

Mr Moore praised the Nowra community for embracing Aboriginal people.

“It’s a great sign when one of the biggest employers in this town invites our mob to be showcased here,” he said.

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