Even in Burma the national broadcaster spreads the news

A CUT to the ABC’s funding would have far-reaching implications, according to former Burma resident Trevor Edmond. 

Mr Edmond was among the protesters in Nowra this week angry at likely funding cuts to the national broadcaster in Tuesday’s budget.

He moved to Australia in 1970 and now lives in Brogers Creek. But even before leaving Burma he had a connection with Australia.

“When I was growing up my family would listen to Radio Australia on the shortwave radio,” he said.

“A lot of people listen to it as a way of finding out what is happening in their own country, not just Australia.

“Radio Australia is significant in many parts of Asia and the Pacific and the government can’t take that away,” he said.

After moving to Australia Mr Edmond’s connection with the ABC continued. He spent time living in a remote Aboriginal community in the central desert region, where he managed the re-broadcast of ABC radio.

“The ABC is important for so many reasons but mostly because people depend on it for local and national information,” he said.

“Most importantly when we have natural disasters people know to turn to the ABC. No other broadcaster covers emergencies like it does.”

GLOBAL VILLAGE: Trevor Edmond used to listen to Radio Australia when he was growing up in Burma.

GLOBAL VILLAGE: Trevor Edmond used to listen to Radio Australia when he was growing up in Burma.

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