Star gazers will be in awe of Corrine’s image

VINCENTIA resident Corinne Le Gall captured a rare view of the Aurora Australis over Jervis Bay on Thursday night.

Aurora Australis, or the southern lights, are usually visible from high southern latitudes in Antarctica, South America, New Zealand, and the bottom of Australia.

It is rare to see it as far north as Jervis Bay.

A keen photographer, who loves taking sunrise and sunsets, sea scapes or as she put it “anything beautiful”,  Mrs Le Gall and a friend took advantage of the perfect conditions at a secret location in Booderee National Park to capture the lights in all their splendour.

“There are apps available that tell you when and where conditions may be right for the phenomena to occur,” she said.

“It all looked good for Wednesday night.

“We went out and the lights were there but weren’t really moving.

“It was just a pink glow with green on top, nothing compared to the following night.

“On Thursday night they were spiking and dancing around, it was just spectacular.

“We captured a rising Milky Way and a shooting star over the water of Jervis Bay.

“You can’t really see that much from the naked eye but through the camera it was amazing.

“Capturing it was a great feeling.”

She said she posted her photos on the Aurora Australis Tasmanian Facebook site and gained a number of hits and responses.

“They were saying it was pretty rare, you don’t get the lights as high up as Jervis Bay. One member even said they had never heard of it,” she said.

“It doesn’t usually come to this latitude, more the bottom of Victoria, Tasmania and New Zealand.

“It’s something I’ve never seen before and it was super exciting when we captured it,” she said.

Mrs Le Gall used a Canon 5D Mark III with a 16-35mm lens and a 20 second time exposure to capture the spectacular lightshow.

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